Massachusetts Alimony Reform Act goes into effect March 1, 2012

The following is a summary of highlights of the new Alimony Reform law in Massachusetts. Alimony: New Law Establishes Durational Limits Long Term marriages (greater than 20 years): Alimony will end at retirement age as defined by Social Security Act; 5 years or less: Maximum Alimony term is 50% of the number of months of marriage; 10 years or less, but greater than 5 years: Maximum Alimony term is 60% of the number of months of marriage; 15 years or less, but greater than 10 years: Maximum Alimony term is 70% of the number of months of marriage; 20 years
Continue Reading

Lawyers say alimony reform a long time coming

Alimony reform in Massachusetts is an issue that has been discussed for years. On March 1, 2012, a new alimony law went into effect that completely changes the law in Massachusetts. Under the old law, the Court had no authority to set durational limits for even the shortest of marriages. The new law establishes durational limits and establishes various classes of alimony. It also provides those paying under the old law the right to seek a modification or termination of alimony where appropriate.  Following is the article from the Lowell Sun in which I am quoted discussing the need for
Continue Reading

What are the requirements for an annulment in MA?

Additional Information: I have been married for 8 months, we have a 10 month old daughter. I just found out that my husband has a criminal background and has been using a fake name since I have known him.   What are the requirements for an annulment in MA?  How should I proceed? ATTORNEY ANSWER: It is unfortuate that you’re going through this situation.  There are various grounds for an annulment in Massachusetts.  The one ground that might fit your situation is fraud.  You would have to show that the fraud went to the heart of the marriage.  The fact that
Continue Reading

In MA, can an order for child support be modified without going to court?

Additional Information: My ex and I have agreed to lowered payments and we have drawn up a new agreement which we both signed and had notarized.   Is what we did legally binding or can she sue me for back child support? ATTORNEY ANSWER: While parties can agree to modify without going to court, such agreements are nonbinding.  She can in fact file a contempt for back child support if she so wishes in the future.  There is an easy Joint Complaint for Modification of child support that can be filed administratively and approved without going to court if the clerk
Continue Reading